Research

Maternal and perinatal outcomes in women with chronic hypertension and risk factors of superimposed preeclampsia

Arife Simsek, Seyfettin Uludag, Abdullah Tuten, Sezin Uludag

Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Istanbul, Turkey

Correspondence: Arife Simsek, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Istanbul, Turkey, Tel: +90 536 4764197, E – mail: draksimsek@yahoo.com.tr


Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate obstetric outcomes among women with chronic hypertension, with and without superimposed preeclampsia, and identify risk factors of superimposed preeclampsia. Material and Methods: This retrospective study included 198 Caucasian women with chronic hypertension (out of 14,424 singleton pregnancies) who delivered in a tertiary care center. Clinical findings, maternal and perinatal outcomes were compared between women with and without superimposed preeclampsia. Results: Superimposed preeclampsia developed in 49.4% (98/198) of women studied. The mean gestational week at delivery and birth weight were significantly lower in women with superimposed preeclampsia (p< 0.05). Incidence of preterm delivery was higher in women with superimposed preeclampsia. Although there weren’t significant differences in frequencies of   intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, early and late neonatal deaths (p > 0.05), maternal near miss cases were significantly higher in women with superimposed preeclampsia (p < 0.05). Only mean arterial blood pressure [OR: 1,070 (1,008-1,135)] was independently associated with the occurrence of superimposed preeclampsia (p: 0.027).
Conclusions: Adverse maternal outcome was more likely to occur in women with suprerimposed preeclampsia.
Chronic hypertension was associated with adverse perinatal outcome, regardless of superimposed preeclampsia.

Keywords: chronic hypertension, preeclampsia, maternal mortality, perinatal mortality

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