Evangelinakis N, Polyzou E, Grammatikakis I, Kassanos D

3rd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Athens, Medical School, Attiko hospital. Athens, Greece

Correspondence: Evangelinakis Nikolaos, 3rd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Athens, Medical School, Attiko hospital, 1 Rimini St, GR-12464, Athens, Greece. E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 


 

Abstract

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in women during pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer presents a challenging clinical situation because of the special and unique circumstances surrounding the growth and differentiation of the developing fetus. The trend towards later age at first childbirth has resulted in an increase in the number of breast cancer cases coexistent with pregnancy. The management of a woman with breast cancer in pregnancy should be performed by a multidisciplinary team comprising of an obstetrician-gynecologist, an oncology surgeon, a radiotherapist, a chemotherapist and a specially trained oncology nurse. Breast surgery can be safely performed during any trimester of pregnancy, while radiation therapy, if required, should be delayed until after delivery. The majority of patients with PABC require chemotherapy and the timing of delivery in relation to chemotherapy administration should be carefully considered. There is no evidence to date that pregnancy termination influences overall survival for the mother, while some researchers suggest that subsequent pregnancy may in fact be associated with an improved overall survival rate.
 

Key words: pregnancy; breast cancer; radiotherapy; chemotherapy